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Tiptree Awards: David Brin Snubbed Again
james_nicoll
According to top interweb sources, the winners are:

Shelley Jackson for Half Life.

Catherynne M. Valente for The Orphan's Tales: In the Night Garden.

Julie Phillips’ James Tiptree, Jr.: The Double Life of Alice B. Sheldon got a special recognition award.

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I find the Shelley Jackson win so very interesting. Mainly because of one of the people who made the short list last year.

I don't follow the Tiptrees closely enough [1] to understand the reference.

It would have been a little odd if the biography had not got a nod of some kind or another.

1: Basically, just whenever some writer with an overdeveloped sense of entitlement throws a hissy fit over not winning.

Well, it's treading into personal life stuff of Shelley Jackson's--she and Wesley Stace used to...something or other, a few years back. His book, Misfortune was shortlisted last year. I just thought it was really interesting, that's all. Mainly because I'm a huge fan of his musical alter ego, John Wesley Harding.

I've been meaning to pick up the Tiptree bio but haven't had a chance.

I never noticed it before but the odds of me having actually read a Tiptree winner or a book that made it to the shortlist are actually even worse than I thought. I have to go back to 2003's Maul (which I found tedious) to find one I've read.


(Deleted comment)
Possibly. I've liked other books by him.

Just for clarification, all me not having read something means is that I haven't read it, not that I am avoiding it.

That book I love with an unreasoning passion.

Let me ask you something--do you think it has a happy ending?

I got into an argument about that with my gay/lesbian lit prof in college about that point.

I think it has a very bittersweet ending. I don't think it's really all that happy.

Happy's not quite the right word--bittersweet is much better. My prof was of the opinion that the end was very tragic and I was...not.

Huh, interesting. It didn't feel tragic to me at all. What it did feel was right.

Agree. It is insanely brilliant.

I've not read a lot of them. Last year's winner, Geoff Ryman, I know because I read his book Was when I was in college, but I've not read anything else. It's certainly a quirky group of winners/short listees.

From one of the announcement posts: "Jackson and Valente will each receive $1000 in prize money..."

...which I initially read as "Jack Valenti will receive $1000 in prize money."

What's this have to do with Brin?

Brin's Glory Season did not win the Tiptree, an affront that he blamed on "a few silly people [who made] certain the book was not considered for the James Tiptree Award (for gender bending SF)."

As I recall, he also provided at least one panel with the opportunity to discuss his surprising loss, despite not actually being on the panel in question.

In actual fact, if one stoops to actually checking the facts, one can see that Glory Season made the long list in 1993.


But did he have anything relevant this year? Did he have anything at all this year for that matter? I haven't seen anything of his for ages, not since Kil'n People. That might just be me not paying attention.

Hmmm. He had a comic called The Life Eater from DC, about which I know nothing and an upcoming (very) short novel from Subterranean called Sky Horizon about which I know even less. He also had three short stories since Kiln People:# A Professor at Harvard (2003), Sky Light (2004) and Mars Opposition (2005), about which I also know nothing.

imbecille

(Anonymous)
People who repeat unverified gossip-stories are as vile as harpies who first spread them behind peoples' backs.

Actually, a couple of this year's nominees are pretty good. But JN overshadowed that topic with a stab-calumny... just as, one day, my mere effrontery of asking some questions was interpreted (completely nonsequitur) as "whining" after a Tiptree. (Hint, I have turned down Hugos. Judge me when you've done that, JN.)

If anyone is interested in what I really said, that day. feel free to ask via: http://www.davidbrin.com

Just remember, JN is a complete dunce.
DB

Well, as I've listened to James for years and he seems to be reasonably intelligent and your post here, "DB", seems to be mostly unmitigated frothing, I'm going to be generous and say you're unlikely to be David Brin, the author, and are a sad little troll who can't seem to handle the concept that "snubbed" isn't always the pejorative that you seem to want to leap to taking affront from.

I can't speak for Brin but I know my writing is not at its most lucid when written in the heat of anger, which I assume the note signed DB was. Note the misspelling, which is something I do when writing angry.

Recognized that it may well have been written in anger - though I would think that a basic spell check might be something a professional writer does as a rote habit.

Taking the "X was snubbed by this award" as a reason to become incensed and rave in a semi-pubic forum? That's not the behaviour of a reasoned and rational individual. As I said, I'm going to be generous and assume that this *wasn't* Brin (yes, I suppose there are ways to narrow down the likelihood, but I don't have the energy for that kind of internet research today), but merely a troll.

Well, I often don't spell-check and all I do for a living is write. That said, I don't think LJ's spell-checker checks subject lines.

Technically, that's not a spelling error, presuming he meant to call you an idiot in italian.

One posting from the same city Brin lives in.

James, hon, you did see the part where I said I was being nice, right?


"Rote habits" are very context-dependent. Writing on your WP and typing into a text box on the web are different tools, different commands, etc. Any habits you might have about checking spelling, or much of anything else, in one environment won't work in the other.

How odd.

In my English, merely stating that "[A] snubbed [B]" doesn't imply any value judgement about [A] or [B], or whether or not the snubbing was merited.

Yes, this looks to me like DB has misread the post.

You know, I remember a convention where David Brin was the guest of honor where he gave a speech about "Where Are All The Young Fen" in which he suggested that, for instance, why didn't Harvard have a science fiction convention?

Five people from various corners of the room yelled, "Vericon is in TWO WEEKS."

And then another voice from a different part of the room yelled, "And we invited you as a guest, too."

After that point, my respect for Brin's skill at creating a fact-based argument plunged.

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