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I was asked this and had no good answer
james_nicoll

Which is your favourite Hugo winning novel?

The Demolished Man
2(0.8%)
They'd Rather Be Right
0(0.0%)
Double Star
2(0.8%)
The Big Time
0(0.0%)
A Case of Conscience
0(0.0%)
Starship Troopers
3(1.3%)
A Canticle for Leibowitz
2(0.8%)
Stranger in a Strange Land
2(0.8%)
The Man in the High Castle
4(1.7%)
Way Station
3(1.3%)
The Wanderer
0(0.0%)
Dune
7(3.0%)
....And Call Me Conrad
1(0.4%)
The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
18(7.6%)
Lord of Light
18(7.6%)
Stand on Zanzibar
6(2.5%)
Left Hand of Darkness
16(6.8%)
Ringworld
6(2.5%)
To Your Scattered Bodies Go
0(0.0%)
The Gods Themselves
2(0.8%)
Rendezvous with Rama
3(1.3%)
The Dispossessed
12(5.1%)
The Forever War
3(1.3%)
Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang
0(0.0%)
Gateway
3(1.3%)
Dreamsnake
2(0.8%)
Fountains of Paradise
0(0.0%)
The Snow Queen
3(1.3%)
Downbelow Station
2(0.8%)
Foundation's Edge
0(0.0%)
Startide Rising
2(0.8%)
Neuromance
6(2.5%)
Ender's Game
1(0.4%)
Speaker for the Dead
1(0.4%)
The Uplift War
1(0.4%)
Cyteen
14(5.9%)
Hyperion
0(0.0%)
The Vor Game
0(0.0%)
Barrayar
6(2.5%)
A Fie Upon the Deep
8(3.4%)
Doomsday Book
3(1.3%)
Green Mars
1(0.4%)
Mirror Dance
12(5.1%)
The Diamond Age
4(1.7%)
Blue Mars
0(0.0%)
Forever Peace
0(0.0%)
To Say Nothing of the Dog
5(2.1%)
A Deepness in the Sky
7(3.0%)
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
2(0.8%)
American Gods
8(3.4%)
Hominids
3(1.3%)
The Paladin of Souls
9(3.8%)
Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell
8(3.4%)
Spin
1(0.4%)
Rainbow's End
1(0.4%)
The Yiddish Policeman's Union
4(1.7%)
The Graveyard Book
0(0.0%)
The Windup Girl
0(0.0%)
The City & The City
6(2.5%)
Black Out/All Clear
0(0.0%)
Among Others
3(1.3%)
Redshirts
1(0.4%)
Tags:

So many good books here... it was hard to choose.

Yeah, this. I ticked The City and the City, then immediately wished I could have ticked Lord of Light, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, The Left Hand of Darkness, and, and, and... as well.

Sure, three-quarters of them I could discard off-hand. But picking from the ones I actually liked was emotionally difficult.

I tossed out a bit more tham 80%, but after that it was very difficult. Finally deciding between Way Station, Dreamsnake & The Snow Queen was pretty much a coin toss for me, and Lord of Light came pretty close thereafter.

Fie Upon the Deep should be Fire. Sorry, cannot correct polls once posted.

And here I was just going to give the typo version extra marks.

(Similarly on Neuromance, the instruction manual. Typos happen, dinna sweat.)

Also, what Pryder and Nathan said. Two or three-way tie, with a requirement to select one, is hard going.

I'll ditto the "hard to choose" option, but Lord of Light is the one I reread most often.

Yup, seconded, that was my criteria, and my choice as well.

(Deleted comment)
See, that was why I had no good answer.

Hmmm... do far, no votes for the most recent nine years. This crowd may be ageing out, speculates this geezer.

I'm sure that Redshirts will get some love here shortly...

I voted for Gateway, but, scanning down the list, it was a remarkably long time before anything topped The Demolished Man. I was tempted by Lord of Light, the Le Guins and The Forever War.

(Deleted comment)
Dear lord. That was a hard decision. I ended up having to mentally roll dice before shrugging and choosing "A Deepness in the Sky", which I liked even better than _"Fie" Upon the Deep_, but I really can't say I wouldn't have chosen any of three or four others instead yesterday or tomorrow.

I've read every novel that won before Downbelow Station, which won the year I was 28.

Anybody have a longer unbroken stretch?

I've read Dune through to Hyperion; before Dune I'm missing They'd Rather Be Right, The Wanderer, and Way Station, all of which I've heard good things of, but never seen.

I picked 5.

Lord of Light
Ringworld
The Forever War
Neuromancer
Diamond Age

I agree, checkboxes would have been better.

I couldn't pick just one. There are books on that list that I re-read, regularly. Heinlein, Zelazny, Scalzi, Haldeman, and others.

--Hawk

Can't pick just one; won't.

In contrast to several commenters so far I had no difficulty picking my favourite of the list - I imprinted on Starship Troopers at an impressionable age, reading it more than a dozen times in my early & mid teens and I remember it fondly. I've only read it a couple of times as an adult (and not that recently) so perhaps when I re-read it next I'll change my opinion but for now of the books on that list it's still my favourite.

Now if the question had been which is the best I'd've had a great deal more difficulty picking just one, and Starship Troopers wouldn't've been on the shortlist :)

Austin: Same tough call here. My "read everything in SF" years were 1960-1985, with a lot of 1950s stuff from anthologies and back-date magazines. So almost every one of the first 35 titles tugged at me, then got filtered through "That was then -- when was the last time you re-read it, or even thought you might someday?"

I hadn't looked at the Hugo list in a while. Nominations but no Hugo for Banks, Mieville, Sterling, or Stross? C'mon, really. And I understand why Neuromancer won, but will the voters ever notice that Gibson's been doing something less flashy but actually much more original and interesting in the recent 'Blue Ant' novels?


Edited at 2014-01-30 05:44 pm (UTC)

The City and The City is Miéville, if that helps.

eta: oops, someone already noted that. Should have read further down the comments.

Edited at 2014-01-30 11:01 pm (UTC)

Also, obligatory complaint about the lack of checkboxes and cats.

Lack of checkboxes was the point. If I have been asked which were my favourites, that I could have answered.

Mieville has a statue for The City & The City. I still think Perdido Street Station was his best book but it was up against the Gaiman juggernaut (American Gods) that year.

I haven't gone and done a complete count, but Charles Stross might hold the record for most Best Novel nominations without a win. I'd have given him one for Accelerando.

Sterling is also in the running for most nominations without a statue. Of the books actually nominated, I'd have given him one for Holy Fire. And a special note for the unnominated Schismatrix, though it wouldn't have won anyway because that year (1986, for novels published in 1985) was a tough field, with Ender's Game getting the nod.

Banks isn't my cup of tea so I won't offer an opinion on his nominations.

Gibson's recent work is so near-future that some readers might not consider it SF. That's the only way I can account for his lack of recent nominations.

D'oh -- don't know how I missed C&C. Gaiman's fun, but I thought Tim Powers had worked American Gods' territory earlier & better -- end even without that, Perdido's clearly better IMO.

Edited at 2014-01-30 06:48 pm (UTC)

Took me less than a minute to decide. Startide Rising.

Although Gateway comes close.

And now I can't get "Fi, Fie, Foe, Fum upon the deep!" out of my head.

How often you've read a book isn't an accurate measure. Some books are comfortable reading that you turn to again and again. Some are challenging reading that are difficult to get through even once but reward the effort. (There are also books that are difficult to get through because they're bad, but that's another discussion.) Some are disturbing and powerful and stick with you without repeat reading. I don't think any one type is best, though the ones in the first category are the ones I will read the largest number of times.

Quite. Which is why I defined "favorite" to mean "am most likely to read again" for the purposes of this poll.

I've re-read _Starship Troopers_ and _Canticle for Leibowitz_ so many times that they are resting now. I chose _Paladin of Souls_ but I'll have a new favourite in a few years time.

I just realized that I hadnt even read the last 9 books on that list.. and I have 4 of them on my TBR.

Its a toss up between Way Station and Lord of Light.. its like saying who is your favorite child.

Choosing among Canticle for Leibowitz, Lord of Light, and Yiddish Policeman's Union was painful.

American Gods, for me. I went with favorite==the book I am most willing to read again. Because someone didn't allow for ticky boxes. Hmph.

Yay! No one agrees with me!

I'm surprised that Lord of Light is the current leader. Zelazny just doesn't do it for me, so that book would be WAY down on my list.

It's possible that one reason is some other authors have their votes split. Zelazny has another book on the list, ...And Call Me Conrad, but it only has one vote. Ursula K. LeGuin has a number of votes for both The Dispossessed (my choice from this list) and The Left Hand Of Darkness, together they have the same number of votes as the two Zelazny books. Lois McMaster Bujold's four books also collectively tie the 15 votes for those other two authors, as of when I last refreshed the counts in my browser.

Other authors with more than one book on the list: Heinlein (FOUR books though two have no votes), Fritz Leiber, Joe Haldeman (notable because his two are 22 years apart), Arthur C. Clarke, C.J. Cherryh, Isaac Asimov, Orson Scott Card (two in consecutive years), David Brin, Kim Stanley Robinson, Vernor Vinge (three), Connie Willis (three), and Neil Gaiman.

25 years ago I suspect Heinlein would have gotten the most votes. His star may be fading a bit.

Edited at 2014-02-02 07:41 am (UTC)

For me it was a toss-up between A Fire Upon the Deep and Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell. Ended up voting for AFUtD just because I never re-read JS&MN.

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